When a startup grows into a midsized company ($10 million to $1 billion in revenue), its executives should be spending more time leading those below them and less time executing tasks that they should now be delegating. For example, a chief human resource officer who still interviews every job candidate is not spending time wisely. Likewise, a sales manager who comes along on every sales call won’t likely have time to set grand sales strategies.

Of course, in moving up from executing tasks to managing others, these leaders will find themselves one step away from “the action” – from doing the recruiting, selling, writing of marketing copy, paying vendors, checking invoices before they go out, and other minutia in which they had to immerse themselves as founders. Yet there is a potential downside to this. Because they become one step removed from the daily hubbub of the business, the leaders of any midsized company risk becoming detached. And the danger here is not only being out of touch with what’s going on with customers, potential customers, recruits, products, services, payments, and so on, it’s becoming out of touch with the people who report to them. I’m talking about their followers.

Unless they get regular, honest feedback from their followers about their abilities as managers, leaders can’t expect to become stronger leaders. Leaders who aren’t clued in to how their followers perceive them are managing blind. And the few who do solicit feedback often don’t use it to improve their leadership abilities. Yet those who do – like the CEO of a midsized insurance company whose story I will tell in a moment – can become highly effective leaders.

When a startup grows into a midsized company ($10 million to $1 billion in revenue), its executives should be spending more time leading those below them and less time executing tasks that they should now be delegating. For example, a chief human resource officer who still interviews every job candidate is not spending time wisely. Likewise, a sales manager who comes along on every sales call won’t likely have time to set grand sales strategies.

Of course, in moving up from executing tasks to managing others, these leaders will find themselves one step away from “the action” – from doing the recruiting, selling, writing of marketing copy, paying vendors, checking invoices before they go out, and other minutia in which they had to immerse themselves as founders. Yet there is a potential downside to this. Because they become one step removed from the daily hubbub of the business, the leaders of any midsized company risk becoming detached. And the danger here is not only being out of touch with what’s going on with customers, potential customers, recruits, products, services, payments, and so on, it’s becoming out of touch with the people who report to them. I’m talking about their followers.

Unless they get regular, honest feedback from their followers about their abilities as managers, leaders can’t expect to become stronger leaders. Leaders who aren’t clued in to how their followers perceive them are managing blind. And the few who do solicit feedback often don’t use it to improve their leadership abilities. Yet those who do – like the CEO of a midsized insurance company whose story I will tell in a moment – can become highly effective leaders.

Blog originally published on Forbes.